Tag Archives: voice

#WordUse Series:
Step Away From the Thesaurus and No One Gets Hurt

You know I love my thesaurus, right? I do. I have at least four of them, from various decades dating back to the ’40s (you’d be surprised how useful that is), as well as a rhyming dictionary, a slang dictionary, and something called the Flip Dictionary, which is more fun than any dictionary has a right […]

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Short Saturday: Write What You Know, Again

I wrote a version of my WWYK article a year ago, but I wasn’t satisfied with it, and I let it sit for months until I could find the time to think about it and tweak it until I was satisfied. And now that I’ve finally published it, there is a best-selling book out that […]

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The Principle of Write What You Know

Do a little search for this phrase—write what you know (WWYK)—and you’ll get all sorts of articles, some deeper, more knowing, than others. Some of these articles contradict. Some make the concept more difficult than it needs to be. But I’m here to make a case for writing what you know—because I have been seeing […]

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Short Saturday: Developing Your Writer’s Voice

Jane Friedman really has some interesting guest writers on her blog. A couple weeks ago, this one from author Jennifer Loudon on developing your writing voice: “5 Ways to Develop Your Writer’s Voice.” (I’ve written some on this myself: here and here, just for starters.) It’s an interesting article, with elements I hadn’t considered. Like […]

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Short Saturday: The Paradox of Voice

I’ve written some about finding your voice (there are links below). Many people have. And you’ll hear lots of different opinions … which makes it difficult for young or inexperienced writers to figure out. What is voice in writing? And how do you identify yours? It’s a mystery until you one day find yourself writing […]

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One Person’s Tic Is Another Person’s Style

Not long ago an author friend of mine mentioned on Facebook that the book he was reading had too much repetition. “Characters frequently curl their fingers into their palms,” he said. “And everything smells like cinnamon.” In the amount of time it took three people to comment, my friend noted that he’d read about the […]

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Short Saturday: More on Narrative Voice

We’ve just been talking about voice (and I think I may have more to say about it, but that’s another blog for another day), but this morning I want to show you two articles from two authors who discuss how they each found their own narrative voice. Meg Rosoff starts by pointing to poetry as an […]

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Have You Found Your Voice Yet?

In the same way that it’s hard to define what makes a great book, or what makes great writing, it is nearly impossible to get a definition of narrative voice in writing. Impossible missions, however, have never frightened Your Editor. Stand back. What you hear most often is your voice is you. Your true self […]

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The Voices in My Head

In this week’s guest post (we’re still operating in the Read Play Edit Blog Recovery Plan), author Norma Horton discusses character creation. The Voices in My Head Authors use a variety of tools to develop characters. My mentor, a Christy-Award-winning author, uses a complex questionnaire. Another author friend creates characters from a pastiche of people she […]

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Step Away From the Thesaurus and No One Gets Hurt

You know I love my thesaurus, right? I do. I have at least four of them, from various decades dating back to the ’40s (you’d be surprised how useful that is), as well as a rhyming dictionary, a slang dictionary, and something called the Flip Dictionary, which is more fun than any dictionary has a […]

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